Research on dating violence

In the study sample, the prevalence of intimate-partner violence for ADV victims was 29 percent at five-year follow-up, and 17.5 percent at 12-year follow-up.Rothman says the findings suggest that more needs to be done to identify adolescents who have experienced dating violence, through screenings in pediatric offices, school-based health centers, and other health care settings.Victimization surveys indicate that lower-income women are, in fact, more frequently victims of domestic violence than wealthier women.Women with family incomes less than ,500 are five times more likely to be victims of violence by an intimate than women with family annual incomes between ,000 and ,000.[28] Although the poorest women are the most victimized by domestic violence,[29] one study also found that women receiving government income support payments through Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) were three times more likely to have experienced physical aggression by a current or former partner during the previous year than non-AFDC supported women.[30] Overall, in the United States, blacks experience higher rates of victimization than other groups: black females experience intimate violence at a rate 35 percent higher than that of white females, and black males experience intimate violence at a rate about 62 percent higher than that of white males and about two and a half times the rate of men of other races.[31] Other survey research, more inclusive of additional racial groups, finds that American Indian/Alaskan Native women experience significantly higher rates of physical abuse as well.[32], † It is unclear how much of the differences in victimization rates by race is the result of willingness to reveal victimization to survey interviewers (Tjaden and Thoennes, 2000).

Corporal punishment is communicating to children that violence is an acceptable means of changing behavior." It's estimated that about 80 percent of children worldwide are subjected to physical punishment, the study authors said. "Although mounting evidence shows the many detrimental effects of corporal punishment, many parents, much of the general public, and even some schools continue thinking this is an acceptable means to punish misbehavior," he said. The study, in the , analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of US high school and middle school students, ages 12 to 17, who were followed into adulthood, 5 and 12 years later.Compared to people who were not victimized in adolescence, those who experienced teen dating violence were more likely to report physical intimate-partner violence in those later years.In addition, prior research has found associations between corporal punishment and problems such as childhood aggression and mental health disorders. For example, one recent study of more than 8,300 California adults found that a history of being spanked in childhood was linked to a 37 percent raised risk of attempting suicide in adulthood, and 33 percent higher odds for adult drug abuse.

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"The current study adds to this knowledge by showing that being physically punished as a child is linked to perpetrating dating violence as a teen and young adult." It's not that big a stretch to connect the two, he added.

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